Skip to main content

Research repositories

Research... write... publish... submit... share...
Share
Share this page

Research repositories at University of Sydney

The University of Sydney has two repositories to promote and support the research and publications of it's staff and higher degree research students: Sydney eScholarship (SeS) and Sydney Research Online (SRO).

Sydney eScholarship (SeS)
  • The Sydney eScholarship repository is a University of Sydney Library initiative. The service provides a platform for research communities to safely store, and provide online access to documents and data. It archives a wide range of significant university publications, forming a core global resource for today's researchers and those of future generations. The publications presented are open access and therefore can be viewed by all.

    To access SeS go to: https://ses.library.usyd.edu.au/

Sydney Research Online (SRO)
What is a repository?
  • An Institutional Repository is a mechanism for the management and storage of digital content as well as providing a record for physical objects and data. It can support research, learning, and administrative processes. Placing content into an institutional repository enables an institution's staff to collaboratively collect, manage, archive, preserve and disseminate its digital assets, and therefore derive maximum value from it.

    Repositories use open standards to ensure that the content they contain is accessible so that it can be searched and retrieved for later use. The use of these internationally agreed open standards allows mechanisms to be set up that import, export, identify, store and retrieve the digital content within the repository.

    Digital repositories may include a wide range of content for a variety of purposes and users. University of Sydney content includes research outputs such as journal articles, book chapters, learning materials, theses, research data and non-traditional research outputs such as exhibitions, performances, musical scores and other artefacts.

    A repository should adhere to and support the institution's open access agenda, making all content freely available. However, due to copyright constraints, some content may need to be locked down or embargoed for a period of time.

    (Adapted from: Australasian Open Access Support Group)


Contact the Repository team for additional support or Dr Robin Burgess, Manager, Repository and digitisation services.